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Research Article

Syphilis at the Crossroad of Phylogenetics and Paleopathology

  • Fernando Lucas de Melo,

    Affiliation: Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

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  • Joana Carvalho Moreira de Mello,

    Affiliation: Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

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  • Ana Maria Fraga,

    Affiliation: Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

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  • Kelly Nunes,

    Affiliation: Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

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  • Sabine Eggers mail

    saeggers@usp.br

    Affiliation: Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

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  • Published: January 05, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000575

Reader Comments (2)

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An historical form of yaws: the goundou

Posted by bmafart on 25 Jan 2010 at 17:37 GMT

I do agree with the opinion of K Harper about the difficulties of the paleopathological diagnostic for treponematoses. Caries sicca are specific lesions but not the lone. There was a historical form of Yaws, the Goundou, that was mainly observed in Sub-saharan Africa and that was specific of this endemic treponematoses. Despite a long discussion about the link between Goundou and yaws, WHO has been classified as an osteoperiostitis of recent yaws.
No one case of goundou have been published since mid 20th century in medical litterature. It belongs now to Paleopathology.
Reference
Mafart B (2002) Goundou, an historical form of yaws. Lancet 360: 1168-1170.

No competing interests declared.